Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Appendix B.05.i.i.03.b. - (Ss-Ste):

[to return to the main document, click here, http://naturocrit.blogspot.com]
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Stadtmauer, M. (ND NCNM) states:
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[in "Hydrotherapy – the Heart of Naturopathic Medicine" (2012)]
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"hydrotherapy is the practice of using hot wet and cold wet applications in various combinations and forms to stimulate the natural healing processes of the body.  In naturopathic medicine, we call this innate healing intelligence the vital force.  The Chinese called it 'qi' and the Indians 'prana'";
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(click here,
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[in "Acupuncture, A Brief Introduction by Jeffrey A. Singer" (2012)]
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"as the basis of acupuncture, Shen Nung theorized that the body had an energy force running throughout it. This energy force is known as qi [...] the qi consists of all essential life activities which include the spiritual, emotional, mental and the physical aspects of life. A person's health is influenced by the flow of qi in the body, in combination with the universal forces of yin and yang [...] if the flow of qi is insufficient, unbalanced or interrupted, yin and yang become unbalanced, and illness may occur. Qi travels throughout the body along 'meridians' or special pathways [...] the connections between them ensure that there is an even circulation of qi, a balance between yin and yang [...] yin and yang is an important theory in the discussion of acupuncture treatment, in relation to the Chinese theory of body systems. As stated earlier qi is an energy force that runs throughout the body. In addition, qi is also prevalent throughout nature as well. Qi is comprised of two parts, yin and yang. Yin and yang are opposite forces, that when balanced, work together";
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(click here,
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Stagg, J.J. (ND Bastyr 2003) states:
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[in "About Naturopathic Medicine" (2010)]
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"naturopathic physicians focus on supporting the bodies innate vital force";
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(click here,
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Stanich, L. (ND NCNM) states:
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[in "Chinese Medicine" (2010)]
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"intregrative[sp.] healing for the body, mind and spirit [...] classical Chinese medicine is a complete system of health care with a continuous clinical history of over 3,000 years. This medical model views the body as a dynamic, interrelated whole possessing a vital energy called qi. Chinese medical theory explains that pain and disease are caused by an imbalance or a blockage of the free flow of this energy circulating through the body. Chinese medical treatment aims to correct imbalances and remove blockages of energy";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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Starbuck, J.J. (ND NCNM?) states:
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[in "Team Up With Natural Immune Boosters!" (2010)]
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"for over 100 years, naturopathic physicians have talked about the body's 'vital force,' a term describing vitality, health, and the capacity to heal. A basic tenet of our medical philosophy is to nurture and enhance this vital force, a label analogous with the now popular 'immune system' [...] we use natural medicine -- food, herbs, homeopathic remedies, hydrotherapy, and lifestyle changes -- to treat the vital force [...] to me, though, treating the immune system is synonymous with strengthening what naturopaths have traditionally called the 'vital force': a complex, multi-faceted pillar of good health. When patients tell me they want to improve their immune system, I am thrilled; this kind of self-awareness is what holistic medicine and true health are all about";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this webpage, click here,
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[in "Let Your Food Be Your Medicine"(Better Nutrition Magazine, 1999-09)]
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"practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine use licorice to replenish the qi (vital force) within the body [p.050]";
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[in "Ginseng and the Roots of Energy"(Better Nutrition Magazine, 1999-08)]
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"Siberian ginseng is used to strengthen the body's qi, or vital force [p.035...] Siberian ginseng is used to strengthen the body's qi or vital force [p.036]";
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Stargrove, M.B. (ND ?) states [in soft quotes]:
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[in "Vitalism (formerly The Magical Staff)" (2005)]
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"an essential assumption behind most natural healing therapies is the recognition that a life force flows through and animates the physical body. This concept of vitalism is both ancient and contemporary [!...] 'this fine book [!] is about theory and practice in the history of medicine. The Magical Staff should help physicians realize that incorporating a more holistic [!] view of the body into their practice is a reaffirmation of their heritage, not a capitulation to something foreign and unscientific [!]. Practitioners of natural medicine can recapture the impulses of their inspiration, gain more understanding of their tradition, and transcend the too-frequent bickering over details of technique by focusing on the underlying unity of these principles and values'";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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Stark, L. (ND CCNM) states:
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[for a bio., click here: http://www.laurastarknd.com/]
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[coded]
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[in "The Princicples of Naturopathic Medicine" (2015)]
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"the naturopathic doctor [...] works with the individual's self-healing process [...#2] vis medicatrix naturae (the healing power of nature): the naturopathic doctor shall recognize, respect and promote the self-healing power of nature inherent in each individual human being. Naturopathic doctors act to identify and remove obstacles to healing and recovery, and to facilitate and increase this inherent and intelligent self-healing process [...] the Naturopathic Physician's Oath [...] I will honour the principles of naturopathic medicine [...#2] to cooperate with the healing powers of nature";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[coded]
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[in "Naturopathic Medicine" (2015)]
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"the naturopathic doctor aims to stimulate the healing power of the body";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[coded]
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[in "Thrive Adult Intake Form" (2015)]
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"naturopathic doctor [...] stimulate the body’s inherent healing capacity";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,

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[coded]
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[in 'homepage' (2014)]
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"at the heart of my approach are the core beliefs that sparked my initial and ever growing passion for naturopathic medicine [...] self-healing. The body is respected as intelligent with healing being an internal process to be supported. The patient, not the doctor, is empowered as the true healer";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,

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Staver, L. (ND NCNM) states:
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[in "Naturopathy" (2010)]
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"naturopathic medicine is a distinctively natural approach to health and healing that recognizes the integrity of the whole person. Naturopathic medicine is heir to the vitalistic tradition of medicine in the Western world, emphasizing the treatment of disease through the stimulation, enhancement, and support of the inherent healing capacity of the person. Methods of treatments are chosen to work with the patient's vital force, respecting the intelligence of the natural healing process [...] the healing power of nature. Vis medicatrix naturae. The body has the inherent ability to establish, maintain, and restore health. The healing process is ordered and intelligent; nature heals through the response of the life force. The physician's role is to facilitate and augment this process [...] first do no harm. Primum no nocere. Illness is a purposeful process of the organism. The process of healing includes the generation of symptoms which are, in fact, an expression of the life force attempting to heal itself. Therapeutic actions should be complimentary to and synergistic with this healing process";
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(click here, 
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(click here,
(archived here,
http://web.archive.org/web/20100815161912/http://www.northwestcrossinghealth.com/SiteMap; may need to choose 'naturopathy' from links][vsc 2010-08-15]
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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Steelsmith, L. (ND Bastyr 1993) states:
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[for a bio., click here,
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[in "Diet is the Key When Trying to Build Up Your Qi" (2004)]
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"prescription. Diet is key when trying to build up your qi [...] in Chinese medicine, your diet can have a profound influence on your vital force, or qi [...] in fact, the food you eat is the basis for the creation of your qi. What you eat, and how you eat, are essential to keeping your entire body healthy [...] avoid eating too many raw foods which can deplete your qi [...] to nourish your digestive qi [...] Chinese medicine also classifies foods as being hot, warming, neutral, cooling or cold. These distinctions don't refer to the temperatures of foods, but rather their 'energetic' properties and their influences on your qi";
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(click here,
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "Dr. Laurie Steelsmith Author of Natural Choices for Women’s Health Interviewed" (2005)]
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"perhaps the single most important tenet in Chinese medicine is the concept of qi [...] qi is your body’s vital energy—not merely the energy of your physical body, but the life force that is the essence of your being";
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(click here,
[vsc 2013-03-09]
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "Natural Immune Boosters for Cold and Flu Season" (2013)]
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"astragalus is another Chinese herb that has a long track record in enhancing immunity. It is known as a ‘qi’ tonic, which means that it strengthens your vital force";
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(click here,
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[in “The Dark Side of Sleep Medications: Natural Solutions for Insomnia”]
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“see a practitioner of Chinese medicine to assess why you may have insomnia from an Eastern point of view. If you are frequently frustrated, your insomnia may be due to what is called ‘liver qi stagnation’ in Chinese medicine. This means that your qi, or vital force, isn’t flowing smoothly, which can lead to feelings of tension in your body. If you feel anxious and have heart palpitations associated with insomnia, you may have what is known as ‘deficient heart yin,’ which means that your yin energy, the feminine aspect of your qi, is depleted; this can cause too much ‘fire’ (a term used in Chinese medicine for yang energy, or the masculine aspect of your qi) to flare up, resulting in agitation, especially at night. Chinese herbal medicines and acupuncture can have profound effects in the treatment of intractable insomnia”;
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "ND Alumna Encourages Women to Get Healthy with 'Great Sex, Naturally'" (2013)]
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"'often women will use their vital energy to raise their children or build a career,' Dr. Steelsmith says. 'But by utilizing naturopathic and Chinese medicine, we can help to shift the vital force of the patient back toward strengthening their sexual energy'";
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(click here,
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[in "Some Pain Sufferers Warming Up to Watsu Therapy" (2013)]
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"watsu therapy is a passive form of bodywork that involves holding the client in warm water while applying pressure to acupuncture points. This helps to stimulate the flow of qi (chee) in the meridians — the body's channels of energy through which qi moves";
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(click here,
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[in "Interstitial Cystitis Can be Healed" (2013)]
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"in Chinese medicine, the approach to treating IC is to work with the body’s qi, or vital force. Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicines can be quite effective in alleviating spasms and decreasing the pain associated with IC by increasing the flow of qi, nourishing yin and yang (two aspects of qi), and treating the underlying cause of the disorder";
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(click here,
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[in "Living Natural Magazine by Karen Villanueva" (2013)]
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"LN: Would you give us an overview of the five elements, qi (chee), and 'energetics' and tell us why understanding these could help alleviate myriad health problems. Dr. LS: [...] by understanding which of the five tends to be your dominant element, you can begin to make lifestyle choices to keep that element balanced,which in turn will keep your whole body healthier. Qi is perhaps the single most important concept in Chinese medicine. Qi is your body’s vital force — not merely the energy of your physical body, but the life force that is the essence of your being. Chinese medicine uses a systematic approach for maintaining and promoting health, based on the premise that qi is responsible for health and disease. Yin and yang—the opposites that exist everywhere in the universe, and in your body—are characteristics or forms of qi. When your yin and yang are in harmony, you will be in perfect health.The term 'energetics' relates to your qi. If your qi is low, you are more prone to illness. By using 'energy medicine,' working with your qi, and strengthening and supporting your vital force, you can heal on a very deep level [...] from a Chinese medicine perspective, the naturally healthy lifestyle includes making sure that you are balancing your qi [...] for example, one of my favorite immune enhancers is reishi mushroom. It has been used for thousands of years to support qi [...] symptoms of frustration and irritability are seen as stagnation of liver qi, and treatment is aimed at keeping your qi flowing through diet, exercise, and specific herbal medicines [...] yin is the 'feminine' aspect of qi, and yang is the masculine aspect";
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(click here,
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[in "Hydrotherapy Can Boost Immunity" (2013)]
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"I often recommend contrast hydrotherapy to help my patients increase their circulation and boost their immune systems. This is one of the many areas where Western and Eastern medicine concur: according to Chinese medicine, contrast hydrotherapy can stimulate your qi, or vital force, and strengthen your immunity";
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(click here,
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[in "Reishi Mushrooms Good for Immune System" (2013)]
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"this means that it was highly regarded and used to prolong life, increase qi (or the vital force) and prevent aging";
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(click here,
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[in "Acupuncture Can Help Enhance Quality of Life" (2013)]
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"acupuncture is a medical procedure that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for more than 2,000 years. It’s based on the theory that qi (energy) flows through meridians (energy highways) in your body. When your qi is balanced, you’re healthy in body, mind and spirit. When it’s imbalanced, illness can result. By inserting acupuncture needles into specific acupuncture points, your qi can be rebalanced [...] they master therapeutic indication for each acupuncture point and which specific combinations can best be used to readjust the flow of qi [...] once a diagnosis has been made, you’ll be given dietary and lifestyle recommendations to help balance your qi";
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(click here,
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[in "Hair Loss in Women"]
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"in traditional Chinese medicine, hair loss is often seen as a deficiency of 'kidney qi,' which can occur when women are overworked or overstressed";
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[in "'Cupping' Often Used with Acupuncture"]
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"cupping is the art of using glass cups that create suction on the skin to stimulate qi (pronounced chee). The cups are typically heated with a lighted cotton ball, although some cupping is done without heat and only suction is used. The cups are left in place up to 30 minutes, or they are pulled along the skin — a technique known as 'running cupping.' Cupping is often used by acupuncturists when a patient has what is referred to in Chinese medicine as 'stuck qi and blood,' which is often associated with conditions such as lung congestion, muscle pain, lower back pain and arthritis. Moxa, like cupping, is often used in conjunction with acupuncture treatments. Made from Artemisia, moxa has been used in China for thousands of years. In Chinese medical terms, moxa is most commonly used to 'warm the interior,' 'expel cold' and 'move qi and blood'";
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(click here,
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[in "Relieve Menstrual Pain Using Natural Methods"]
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"in Chinese medicine, menstrual cramps are most often caused by what is known as 'qi and blood stagnation' [...] for qi and blood stagnation, one of the best formulas is Free and Easy Wanderer [...] if cramps are due to qi and blood stagnation, then increasing circulation before and during your period may help solve the underlying problem";
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(click here,
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[in "Acupuncture Works in Less-Mysterious Ways"]
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"it works by stimulating the flow of qi (pronounced chee) with very small, sterile needles inserted into specific points on the body. Qi is described as the body’s life force, or vital energy, and is said to travel on pathways called meridians";
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(click here,
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[in "Some Herbs, Foods Can Boost Immunity to Colds and Flu"]
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"astragalus root, which has been used in China for thousands of years, is a great herbal medicine for enhancing immunity through its ability to strengthen your vital force, or qi (pronounced chee). Studies show astragalus has specific effects on increasing the production of immune cells that destroy viruses and bacteria. The herb is prescribed to prevent a cold or flu, and also recommended if you've just gotten over a flu to help rebuild your qi and prevent another attack";
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(click here,
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[in "Siberian Ginseng Can be Good for What Ails You"]
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"according to traditional Chinese medicine, it helps to build your qi (vital force)";
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(click here,
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[in "Try Natural Alternatives to Pain Drugs"]
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"in Chinese medicine, acupuncture is used to help increase the flow of qi, thereby reducing pain and inflammation";
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(click here,
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[in "Acupuncture Helps Women with Hot Flashes, Especially if They're on Tamoxifen or Arimidex"]
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"this is an exciting development, because it indicates a willingness on the part of conventional oncology to accept the validity of the ancient Chinese system of stimulating qi, or the vital force, for health benefits";
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(click here,
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[in "What is the Best Response to Lower Back Pain?"]
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"according to traditional Chinese medicine, chi (the life force) flows through the body’s pathways of energy (meridians). Back pain is due to stuck chi. When acupuncture needles are inserted into contracted muscles, the muscles relax and allow the chi to flow. By releasing tight muscles, pressure is taken off the spine, where there could be pinched or irritated nerves causing problems such as sciatic pain. Chinese herbs can also be used in the treatment of back pain to move stuck chi and decrease pain";
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(click here,
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[in "Homeopathic Medicines Aid Body in Overcoming Common Ailments"]
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"homeopathy is an effective nontoxic system of medicine used for treating a wide variety of ailments. It works with your body’s natural 'vital force' [...] it is recommended that you avoid ingesting coffee or mint products while taking homeopathic remedies because these could reduce the effectiveness of the medicine";
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(click here,
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[in 'Change Your Attitude, Change Your Life with Joan Herrmann' "Dr. Laurie Steelsmith: Natural Health Choices" (2012)]
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"[host] Dr. Steelsmith is a leading spokesperson on natural medicine [...] the book is 'Natural Choices For Women's Health' [...] you say that our body has the power to heal itself [...LS] your body has an incredibly innate ability to not only heal from a cut but actually to heal from most of the things that you may be suffering from [...] naturopathic medicine focuses on treating the underlying cause of disease. It utilizes medicines that help to stimulate the body's own healing process, it doesn't just suppress symptoms [...] energy, people want more energy, they want more vitality [...] ultimately what we need to do, we need to rekindle this powerful life force in them which we call chiChi is from Chinese medicine [...] in my book I have it all outlined for the reader on how they can rekindle this powerful life force.  This powerful life force is a creative force, and it's vitality, and it's the energy that you need to live a happy wonderful life, and have creative energy [...] I've been doing Chinese medicine for close to twenty years now [...] this medicine was formed thousands of years ago and it still holds true today [...] in fact, a lot of the theories in Chinese medicine are being confirmed by Western research [...] for instance, in Chinese medicine they talk about how the liver stores the blood and blood is a form of chi, and in Western medicine we find that when people are at rest the liver stores most of your body's blood [...] acupuncture [...] it works on tapping into a person's body's own life force and their own chi and it helps to redirect that energy [...] it's actually tapping in to the body's own vital force, their own energy [...] to create wellness [...] pushing the body's energy in the right direction [...] it's very beneficial [...] if you have physical and structural issues, it's phenomenal [...] it is a phenomenal form of medicine";
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(click here,
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Steriti, R. (ND SCNM) states:
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[in "Philosophy of Health and Wellness" (2010)]
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supernatural concepts, such as vital force [...] the province of religion [...per Hahnemann] vitalism: 'in the state of health a spirit-like vital force (dynamis) animating the material human organism reigns in supreme sovereignty' [...] 'spirit-like vital force (vital principle)' [...] 'it is only the pathologically untuned vital force that causes diseases' [...] 'cure, which is the elimination of all the perceptible signs and symptoms of disease, means also the removal of the inner modifications of the vital force which underlies them: in this way the whole disease has been destroyed' [...] a healing crisis is an acute reaction resulting from the ascendancy of nature’s healing forces over disease conditions. A disease crisis is an acute reaction resulting from the disease condition over the healing forces of the organism [...] maintaining a healthy vital force is done with [etc.]";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "An Introduction to Naturopathy and Naturopathic Medicine" (2010)]
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“classical homeopathy [...] symptoms of past illnesses which come to the surface in a reverse order of their appearance. This is considered a very positive sign that the individual’s life force is being stimulated and strengthened”;
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "Naturopathic Medicine is a Different Paradigm" (2010)]
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"naturopathic medicine is a different paradigm [...] on the one hand there is the conventional medical paridigm [sp....which] is based on the scientific method [...while] ancient medical systems view health and disease in an entirely different way [...] classical homeopathy is based on the energy of life, referred to as the 'vital force' which animates all living beings";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "Should we Vaccinate?" (2010)]
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“constitutional homeopathy can also be used to strengthen the vital force of your children";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "Naturopathy" (2010)]
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"maintaining a healthy vital force is done with: adequate sleep; sunlight; fresh air; water (for drinking and bathing); proper food (high in vegetables and fruits); a good mental attitude; and a proper way of life";
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(click here,
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[in "Introduction to Herbology" (2010)]
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"according to ayurveda there are three primary life-forces in the body corresponding to three biological humours. Vata corresponds to the element air or wind, pitta to the element fire, and kapha to the element water. Disease are thought to be caused by an imbalance in the humours";
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(click here,
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Stevens, J.M. (ND Bastyr), Stevens, J. (ND Bastyr) state:
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[in "Naturopathic Medicine" (2013)]
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"the practice of naturopathic medicine centers on six principles of healing [...#1] the healing power of nature, vis medicatrix naturae: the body has the inherent ability to establish, maintain, and restore health. The healing process is ordered and intelligent; nature heals through the response of the life force. The naturopathic doctor’s role is to facilitate and augment this process [...] first do no harm, primum no nocere: the process of healing includes the generation of symptoms, which are, in fact, expressions of the life force attempting to heal itself. Therapeutic actions should be complementary to and synergistic with this healing process. One’s actions can support or antagonize the actions of vis medicatrix naturae";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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[in "Services" (2013)]
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"naturopathic physicians seek to restore and maintain optimum health in their patients by emphasizing nature's inherent self-healing process [...] homeopathy [...] the administration of a minute dose of the correct medicine allows the vital force of a person to heal the individual and move them toward wellness";
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(click here,
(archived here,
(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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Stewart, T. (ND BINM) states:
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[in "Principles of Naturopathic Medicine" ()]
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"[#2] the healing power of nature: the body has an inherent ability to heal itself. This healing process and life force is ordered and intelligent to optimally restore health";
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(click here,
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Steyr, J. (ND CCNM) states:
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[in "About Naturopathic Medicine" (2016)]
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"homeopathic medicine [...] when carefully matched to the patient they are able to affect the body’s 'vital force' and to stimulate the body’s innate healing forces on both the physical and emotional levels [...] traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture: the key principle that defines and connects all of Chinese medicine is that of chi, or vital energy. The chi of all organs must be in balance, neither too active nor too dormant, for a person to be healthy. The chi of the body’s organs and systems are all connected in meridians or channels that lie just under the skin. Your naturopathic doctor will use eastern herbs and acupuncture to assist the body in regulating the chi and achieving balance";
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[in "Naturopathic Medicine Services" (2016)]
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"homeopathic remedies [...] when carefully matched to the patient they are able to affect the body’s 'vital force' and to stimulate the body’s innate healing forces on both the physical and emotional levels [...] traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture: the key principle that defines and connects all of Chinese medicine is the idea chi, or vital energy that runs through the body must be in balance";
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(for the archive.org history of this page, click here,
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